How do Middle School SAT Scores Compare to High School SAT Scores?

Were you a middle school SAT student and are now wondering how those scores will compare to how you’ll do as a high school SAT taker? Well, if you are, you are not alone. Many middle school students take the SAT for a variety of reasons including  to determine eligibility for gifted programs and to become a better test taker in a (virtually) stress-free situation.

One of the most common outcomes of being a middle school SAT student is the curiosity about what those middle school SAT scores mean compared to high school SAT score results. These results can vary greatly from person to person and from test to test, but here is some of what The Right Path’s research has discovered from the message boards on College Confidential.

College Confidential Reports

  • LadyInRed (Sr. Member, March 2005 – Out of 1600)
    • 1040 (7th grade)
    • 1540 (11th grade)
  • RandomPerson (Member since 2005 – Out of 1600)
    • 1570 (8th grade)
    • 1570 (11th grade – PSAT)
  • PioneerJones (Member since March 2010)
    • 1810 (7th grade)
    • 2320 (11th grade)
  • YoHoYoHo (Member since May 2010)
    • 1640 (7th grade)
    • 2380 (11th grade)
  • BlueCanary (Member since May 2010)
    • 1610 (7th grade)
    • 2220 (11th grade)

This is just a very small sampling of what those have posted to College Confidential. It is worth checking out by clicking the above link if you are interested. Posts range from basic scores to witty responses.

Many of the students posting at College Confidential are bright kids who took the SAT in middle school to be eligible for gifted programs so do not be discouraged if your results are not similar. Keep working and keep taking those sample tests. SAT scores only get better with effort! _________________________________________________________________________

College Confidential can be a treasure trove of information, but be aware that there are few checks to the validity of student postings. The score ranges presented here are assumed to be true, but have not been verified. They are for informational and amusement purposes only. 🙂